Interview Advice

Research The Company And The Position

The more you know about the company and the job you are applying for, the better you will appear in the interview. An interviewer will be impressed by your interest and motivation, and you will be able to explain what you can do for the company. Find out as much key information as you can about the company, its products and its customers. If possible, talk to people who work at the company. There may be other sources of information on the Web, especially if the company is publicly traded.

Prepare for the actual interview

Practice your answers to common questions. Likewise, prepare a list of questions to ask the employer. Most interviews follow this pattern: First, you answer questions about your experience and qualifications, then you ask questions about the job.

Rehearse your interview with a friend. You should be able to convey all pertinent information about yourself in 15 minutes. Tape yourself to check your diction, speed, and body language.
Prepare your interview materials before you leave. Bring several copies of your CV (even though they would have received this from Morgan Healey), a list of references, and, if appropriate, any work samples. Make sure they are all up-to-date.

Dress professionally and comfortably. You will be judged in some respects by what you wear. When in doubt, dress conservatively.

For Women:

A straight-forward business suit is best.
Wear sensible shoes.
Be moderate with make-up and perfume.
Wear simple jewellery.
Hair and fingernails should be well-groomed.

For Men:

A clean, ironed shirt and conservative tie are a must.
A simple jacket or business suit is a good idea as well.
Shoes should be polished.
Face should be clean-shaven; facial hair should be neatly trimmed.
Hair and fingernails should be well-groomed.
Use cologne or after-shave sparingly.
Bring a pen and a notepad to jot down any information you may need to remember (but don’t take notes during the interview).

Asking Questions During A Job Interview

At most interviews, you will be invited to ask questions of your interviewer. This is an important opportunity for you to learn more about the employer, and for the interviewer to further evaluate you as a job candidate. It requires some advance preparation on your part.

Here are some guidelines for asking questions:

Prepare five good questions. Understanding that you may not have time to ask them all. Ask questions concerning the job, the company, and the industry or profession. Your questions should indicate your interest in these subjects and that you have read and thought about them. For example, you might start, “I read in Computer Weekly that … I wonder if that factor is going to have an impact on your business.”
Don’t ask questions that raise warning flags. For example, asking “Would I really have to work weekends?” implies that you are not available for weekend assignments. If you are available, rephrase your question. Also, avoid initiating questions about compensation (pay, holidays, etc.) or tuition reimbursements. You might seem more interested in money or time-off than the actual job.

Don’t ask questions about only one topic. People who ask about only one topic are often perceived as one dimensional and not good candidates.

Clarify. It’s OK to ask a question to clarify something the interviewer said. Just make sure you are listening. Asking someone to clarify a specific point makes sense. Asking someone re-explain an entire subject gives the impression that you have problems listening or comprehending. For example, you can preface a clarifying question by saying: “You mentioned that at ABC Company does (blank) . . .Can you tell me how that works in practice?”

Making A Good Impression At Job Interviews

Here’s what you should keep in mind the day of the interview and immediately afterward.

Before the Interview
Be on time. Being on time (or early) is usually interpreted by the interviewer as evidence of your commitment, dependability, and professionalism.
Be positive and try to make others feel comfortable. Show openness by leaning into a greeting with a firm handshake and smile. Don’t make negative comments about current or former employers.
Relax. Think of the interview as a conversation, not an interrogation. And remember, the interviewer is just as nervous about making a good impression on you.

During The Interview

Show self-confidence. Make eye contact with the interviewer and answer his questions in a clear voice. Work to establish a rapport with the interviewer.
Remember to listen. Communication is a two-way street. If you are talking too much, you will probably miss cues concerning what the interviewer feels is important.
When it is your turn, ask the questions you have prepared in advance. These should cover any information about the company and job position you could not find in your own research.

Do not ask questions that raise red flags. Ask, “Is relocation a requirement?”, and the interviewer may assume that you do not want to relocate at all. Too many questions about holidays may cause the interviewer to think you are more interested in taking time off than helping the company. Make sure the interviewer understands why you are asking these questions.

Show you want the job. Display your initiative by talking about what functions you could perform that would benefit the organisation, and by giving specific details of how you have helped past employers. You might also ask about specific details of the job position, such as functions, responsibilities, who you would work with, and who you would report to.

Avoid negative body language. An interviewer wants to see how well you react under pressure.
Avoid these signs of nervousness and tension:
Frequently touching your mouth
Faking a cough to think about the answer to a question
Gnawing on your lip
Tight or forced smiles
Swinging your foot or leg
Folding or crossing your arms
Slouching
Avoiding eye contact
Ending The Interview

End the interview with a firm handshake and thank the interviewer for his or her time. Reiterate your interest in the position and your qualifications. If they offer to contact you, politely ask when you should expect the call.

If you want the job then ASK FOR IT! Yes, that’s right, tell them that you want to work for their company – be positive and show your interest. Good luck!

Video Testimonial:

Video: Welcome to Globus

What is said about us ?

Video: Who We Are

EMEA Coverage

Globus has completed assignments across all of Europe and the Middle East. We speak core languages such as German, French and English.

Our exposure to countries such as Russia, CIS and APAC is increasing with recent assignments in Latin America and South Africa.

Search Vacancies

Want Our Latest Vacancies Emailed Directly to You ?



Contact Us


   +44 (0) 115 896 9844

   Globus Executive Search
   1 Devereux Way
   Boston Road Ind Park
   Horncastle
   LN10 6NE


  recruit@globussearch.eu

   Globus Executive Search on LinkedIn

Alexander Ross – Founder and Principal Consultant


With over 10 years experience in executive search coupled with more than 6 years in the security industry I have the tenure to provide expertise in this field. I lead the team from the front and I enjoy getting my hands dirty so to speak. I participate in every search and one value I always stick to is 'my word is my bond'.

alexander@globussearch.co.uk                                                        

Why not register for the Weekly Jobs Newsletter at the same time?

[contact-form 1 "Contact form 1"]

Simon Metcalfe – Consultant


Simon has many years experience of recruitment and spends alot of his time managing the recruitment website www.securityjobsfinder.co.uk. This is a specialist security website which was designed by us to provide security installation engineers, guards and sales support services.

Visit www.securityjobsfinder.co.uk

Jackie Annibal – Researcher